An Introduction to 4E Cognition: Interview with Shaun Gallagher

Interview with Shaun Gallagher at the 2017 Summer Institute on Buddhism and Science, Putting the Buddhism/Science Dialogue on a New Footing, hosted by the Mangalam Research Center from July 17-26, 2017.

Shaun Gallagher, PhD, is the Lillian and Morrie Moss Professor of Excellence in Philosophy at the University of Memphis. His areas of research include phenomenology and the cognitive sciences, especially topics related to embodiment, self, agency and intersubjectivity, hermeneutics, and the philosophy of time. Dr. Gallagher has a secondary research appointment at the University of Wollongong, Australia. He is Honorary Professor at the University of Tromsø, Norway, and was Honorary Professor at the University of Copenhagen (2010-15) and the Durham University (2011-16). He has held visiting positions at the Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, Cambridge University; the Center for Subjectivity Research, University of Copenhagen; the Centre de Recherche en Epistémelogie Appliquée (CREA), Paris; the Ecole Normale Supériure, Lyon; the Humboldt University in Berlin, and most recently at Keble College, University of Oxford. Professor Gallagher currently holds the Humboldt Foundation’s Anneliese Maier Research Award [Anneliese Maier-Forschungspreis] (2012-18). Gallagher is a founding editor and a co-editor-in-chief of the journal Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences. His publications include How the Body Shapes the Mind (Oxford, 2005); The Phenomenological Mind (with Dan Zahavi, Routledge, 2008; 2nd ed. 2012); Phenomenology (Palgrave Macmillan 2011); and Enactivist Interventions: Rethinking the Mind (Oxford, August 2017).

In this interview, he discusses cognitive science and embodied cognition.

This project was made possible through the generous support of a grant from the John Templeton Foundation. The opinions expressed in this video are those of the speaker(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the John Templeton Foundation.

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